Monday, July 18, 2011

Review: Brooklyn's Finest

Brooklyn's Finest (2009)
132 min  -  Action | Crime | Drama

Richard Gere, Don Cheadle and Ethan Hawke


Let me just start by saying I was not a fan of Training Day which you might note is on the picture for this movie(from the director of ), I thought Narc which came out a year later than that of Training Day was a far better film.



This time around we get more corrupt cops and dealers that run the city, however Clarence Butler(Don Cheadle) is under Deep Cover as "Tango" working with the biggest drug dealer in town Casanova Phillips(Wesley Snipes)there is some great work here by both actors.


Eddie Dugan(Richard Gere) is your cop that is retiring but his boss wants him to take along a rookie for his last few rides--he has seven days until retirement.Through the film he ignores women being beaten or mistreated right before him but has a saving grace near the end of the film, which was no real surprise when it happened having viewed many cop movies in my life this was of very little originality.
When you have great corrupt cop movies like Serpico among others this one rang true for sometime however fell apart very quickly.


Detective Sal Procida(Ethan Hawke)is very tempted by the power of being a corrupt officer from the beginning of the film he shoots someone which later on is identified as Bobby "Carlos" Power(Vincent D' Onofrio)for some money.
His wife Angela(Lilli Taylor) has asthma and is pregnant so he is needing a down payment on a new house that does not have mould in the walls.
All in all the acting is top notch, however the script just doesn't give them all enough good material to work with Lilli Taylor is one of my favorite actors ever but is given a bit part here(unfortunately).
I would have liked it better if the scenes mended together better but the editing was quite bad and tried too many times to tie it all together like Robert Altman's Short Cuts














also like Crash(Paul Haggis)both films were much better.













Thanks for Reading This
Sincerely
Anthony Nadeau